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Brazilian family was hacked to death by a nephew, Spanish police confirm

A Facebook picture of the couple that was hacked to death in Pioz (Guadalajara).

The case of the Brazilian family found hacked to death inside a house in central Spain has taken a surprising new turn.

Although investigators first suspected a settling of accounts over drug debts as the motive for the crime, sources familiar with the investigation have confirmed that the couple and their two small children were in fact assassinated by the father’s own nephew, a year-old Brazilian citizen described as “violent and unstable.”

Three days after the discovery, a Spanish court issued an international arrest warrant against Patrick Nogueira 

The Spanish Civil Guard is also accusing Brazilian authorities of letting the suspect go after he returned to Brazil on a flight from Spain shortly after the grisly discovery.

“We have no doubt whatsoever that it was him, François Patrick Nogueira, the victims’ nephew,” said Civil Guard Commander Reyes at a press conference held on Wednesday in Guadalajara. “We have a large amount of evidence.”

A couple of days ago, police in his home town of Joao Pessoa (capital of Paraiba state) took a statement from the suspect and then let him go despite the evidence in their power, said the Spanish law enforcement officer.

Grisliest crime in memory

The corpses were found inside plastic bags in mid-September after neighbors complained about the stench coming from the house. Investigators believe the victims had been dead for at least a month.

Police were shocked to find that the couple’s young children, aged one and five, had also been dismembered in one of the grisliest crimes in Spain’s collective memory.

The Spanish Civil Guard gave a press conference on Wednesday.

This led investigators to initially suspect that the parents may have been on the run over drug debts, and that the murder was “a methodical crime” probably perpetrated by “narcos and hired killers” described as “very tough and professional people.”

But on Wednesday, investigators revealed that the killer is in fact one François Patrick Nogueira Gouveira, the year-old nephew of Marcos Nogueira. The killings are now being described as a “crime of passion.”

Two days after the bodies were discovered, the young man, who had been living in Spain, took a flight back to Brazil. At one point he had lived for four months with his uncle and aunt, Janaina Santos Américo, with whom he was reportedly obsessed.

That was before the family moved to a detached home in Pioz, in the sparsely populated Guadalajara province, in what investigators now believe was a bid to get away from the young man. Janaína had complained about him to her own relatives in Brazil.

He was described as having “a psychotic personality” and is said to have “seriously attacked a teacher in Brazil while still underage.” The Brazilian media outlet Globo.com, which first revealed the identities of the victims, reports that the suspect stabbed a teacher at age 16 in an assassination attempt.

An arrest warrant

On September 22, just three days after the bodies were found, a court in Guadalajara issued an international arrest warrant against Patrick Nogueira Gouveira. By then, he was already back in Brazil after changing his travel date from the original November The date change was made just 24 hours after news broke of the grisly discovery in Pioz.

Brazilian authorities have been uncooperative so far, leading Spanish investigators to partially release information about the case.

One of Marcos Nogueira’s siblings, Walfran Campos, is trying to collect the €25, required to take the bodies back to Brazil for burial.

English version by Susana Urra.

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Patricia Ortega Talks About Her Second Feature, Being Impossible &#; SXSW Filmmaker In Focus

The SXSW Film Festival is almost upon us and we can’t wait to have you here! Before you make your way down to Austin, TX, get to know films from our lineup a little bit better with our Filmmaker In Focus series. Dive into our Q&A with director Patricia Ortega, as she tells us about her film Being Impossible, which will have its North American Premiere in the Global screening section.

In your own words, what does this film mean to you?

Patricia Ortega: This movie came in the middle of a storm: my mother got cancer, I was divorcing and my life changed completely. Being Impossible was the bridge that helped me navigate all these situations as a lifesaver. I discovered that the characters can also speak to us from the story. Ariel, my protagonist, became my counselor. While she took strength in history to assume her identity, she also helped me face my transformation. Being Impossible is a film of changes from an aesthetic, narrative and personal point of view. This film is nothing like what I had done before, it marks the beginning of a more personal and intimate formal search. In the same way that Ariel begins a new life at the end of the story, I also began to be someone else. Sometimes the cinema becomes a projection of our lives.

What motivated you to tell this story?

PA: I grew up in a Catholic and conventional family. I was always the black sheep, the crazy one, the one who never studied a &#;decent&#; career, or the woman who did not want to be a princess. Despite all this, I ended up in a conventional marriage in which I lost myself. When I started to break it, thousands of sensations and changes in my identity and way of seeing life awakened. In the midst of these conflicts, the question that inspired this film was born: Why is being a woman or a man defining our lives? I am a little woman and a little man, I understood that I am incapable of adapting to the traditional feminine role. From there, history was born and grew to become the movie that it is today.

What do you want the audience to take away?

PA: I want people to ask lots of questions. I want to awaken contradictions and open other angles. I would like my film to be like a current capable of removing stones. It is not about your liking or not, it is about awakening possibilities, contrasts.

What were you doing when you found out you were coming to SXSW?

PA: This is a good question! When I received the beautiful news that we had been selected to SXSW, in Venezuela, Juan Guaidó ends up proclaiming himself president of transition in my country. I was worried and in the expectation of what was happening and I still have it. At the same time, I was working hard on my next film and surviving this daily odyssey that is being Venezuelan.

What made you choose SXSW to showcase your film to the world?

PA: It is an excellent space of exchange without borders. And my film talks about that, about the need to blur the traditional limits that regulate our humanity. I have always been a follower of SXSW as a special festival where industry and art merge into a whole. The right place to launch our movie to the world.

Add Being Impossible to your SXSW Schedule. Stay tuned in the coming weeks as we share more interviews with our SXSW filmmakers!

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Register and book your hotel now to save! The Film Badge gets you primary access to all SXSW Film events including Film Keynotes and Featured Sessions, world premieres, round tables, workshops, parties, and more. Over the course of nine days, the SXSW Film Festival hosts over screenings! Film registrants also have primary access to Convergence events, including the Comedy Festival and nine unique Conference tracks, as well as secondary access to most Interactive and Music events.

Sours: https://www.sxsw.com/film//patricia-ortega-talks-about-her-second-feature-being-impossible-sxsw-filmmaker-in-focus/
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Patricia Ortega

Venezuelan film director

Patricia Ortega (Venezuelan Spanish pronunciation: [paˈtɾisia oɾˈteɡa], born 1977) is a Venezuelan film director. She has won multiple accolades, particularly for her 2018 film Being Impossible.

Early life[edit]

Ortega says that she has been a movie lover since she was young, and so the decision to become a filmmaker was natural. She has studied journalism at university.[1]

Career[edit]

Ortega studied at the Escuela Internacional de Cine y Televisión in Cuba, specialising in Film Direction.[2]

After creating some short films, Ortega became president of the independent Venezuelan production company Mandrágora Films in 2009. In the next ten years, she made ten short fiction and documentary films with the company; in 2013 she directed her first feature film, El regreso (English: The Return), which saw a wide commercial release in cinemas across Venezuela.[2]

Her second feature film, Being Impossible (Spanish: Yo, imposible), however, did well internationally and has yet to be released in her home nation.[needs update][3] Ortega has drawn strength from Being Impossible during times of both personal and political upheaval.[4] She found out that Being Impossible would be screening at the US film festival South by Southwest on the same day that Juan Guaidó was declared Acting President of Venezuela; she found the news of the screening "beautiful", but this was overwhelmed by the political situation that "worried" her.[4] Ortega won the Best Director and Best Screenplay awards at the Venezuelan Film Festival in June 2019 for Being Impossible.[5]

In 2019, she began development of her third feature film, Mamacruz.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Ortega was raised in a religious Catholic family, and says that she was always the black sheep of the family who did not follow traditional roles. She is divorced,[4] and has lived in Porlamar on the Venezuelan Caribbean island of Margarita since January 2019.[3]

Filmography[edit]

Awards and nominations[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patricia_Ortega
Binibini 34: Gabriela Patricia Ortega - Binibining Pilipinas 2017 Interview

Patricia Ortega

Venezuelan film director

Patricia Ortega (Venezuelan Spanish pronunciation:&#;[paˈtɾisia oɾˈteɡa], born ) is a Venezuelan film director. She has won multiple accolades, particularly for her film Being Impossible.

Early life[edit]

Ortega says that she has been a movie lover since she was young, and so the decision to become a filmmaker was natural. She has studied journalism at university.[1]

Career[edit]

Ortega studied at the Escuela Internacional de Cine y Televisión in Cuba, specialising in Film Direction.[2]

After creating some short films, Ortega became president of the independent Venezuelan production company Mandrágora Films in In the next ten years, she made ten short fiction and documentary films with the company; in she directed her first feature film, El regreso (English: The Return), which saw a wide commercial release in cinemas across Venezuela.[2]

Her second feature film, Being Impossible (Spanish: Yo, imposible), however, did well internationally and has yet to be released in her home nation.[needs update][3] Ortega has drawn strength from Being Impossible during times of both personal and political upheaval.[4] She found out that Being Impossible would be screening at the US film festival South by Southwest on the same day that Juan Guaidó was declared Acting President of Venezuela; she found the news of the screening "beautiful", but this was overwhelmed by the political situation that "worried" her.[4] Ortega won the Best Director and Best Screenplay awards at the Venezuelan Film Festival in June for Being Impossible.[5]

In , she began development of her third feature film, Mamacruz.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Ortega was raised in a religious Catholic family, and says that she was always the black sheep of the family who did not follow traditional roles. She is divorced,[4] and has lived in Porlamar on the Venezuelan Caribbean island of Margarita since January [3]

Filmography[edit]

Awards and nominations[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patricia_Ortega

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Patricia Ortega

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Patricia Ortega
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Associate of Applied Science Degree
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Diferencia entre #Documental y #Ficción según la cineasta Patricia Ortega

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