Parachute with wings badge

Parachute with wings badge DEFAULT

US Army Parachute Badge

The first Parachute badge was designed during World War II by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough of the st Parachute Battalion. His mission was the procurement of a suitable parachutist badge with would meet with the approval both of the War Department and the Commanding Officer of the st Parachute Battalion. He got full authority to approve from Major Miley (commander of the st) and the Chief of Infantry. After the approve of the sketch there expired in the near future badges, procured from the Bailey, Banks & Biddle Company in Philadelphia, in the hands of the Commanding Officer of the st Parachute Battalion by March 14,

Description:
An oxidized silver badge 1 13/64 inches in height and 1 1/2 inches in width, consisting of an open parachute on and over a pair of stylized wings displayed and curving inward.
Symbolism: the wings suggest flight and, together with the open parachute, symbolize individual proficiency and parachute qualifications.

Criteria:
Awarded to any individual who has satisfactorily completed the prescribed proficiency tests while assigned or attached to an airborne unit or the Airborne Department of the Infantry School; or participated in at least one combat parachute jump.

Stars representing participation in combat jumps had been worn unofficially on parachute wings during and after World War II. The small stars are superimposed on the appropriate badge to indicate combat jumps as follows:

One combat jump : A bronze star centered on the shroud lines 3/16 inch below the canopy.
Two combat jumps : A bronze star on the base of each wing.
Three combat jumps : A bronze star on the base of each wing and one star centred on the shroud lines 3/16 inch below the canopy.
Four combat jumps : Two bronze stars on the base of each wing.
Five combat jumps : A gold star centred on the shroud lines 5/16 inch below the canopy.

The Parachutist Badge was formally approved on 10 March Stars representing participation in combat jumps had been worn unofficially on parachute wings during and after World War II until they were approved by Headquarters, Department of the Army on December 14,

Sours: https://www.tracesofwar.com/awards//US-Army-Parachute-Badge.htm

Parachutist Badge (United States)

Award

Senior Parachutist Badge

Master Parachutist Badge

Navy & Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia

The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as "Jump Wings" is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces. The United States Space Force and United States Coast Guard are the only branches that do not award the Parachutist Badge, but their members are authorized to receive the Parachutist Badges of other services in accordance with their prescribed requirements. The DoD military services are all awarded the same Basic Parachutist Badge. The U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force issue the same Senior and Master Parachutist Badges while the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps issue the Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Badge to advanced parachutists. The majority of the services earn their Basic Parachutist Badge through the U.S. Army Airborne School.

Army[edit]

The Army's Basic Parachutist Badge is awarded to all military personnel of any service who complete the US Army Basic Airborne Course at Fort Benning, Georgia. It signifies that the soldier is a trained military parachutist, and is qualified to participate in airborne operations. The badge and its sew-on equivalent may be worn on the Army Combat Uniform (ACU).[2]

The original Army Parachutist Badge was designed in by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough and approved by the Department of War in March of that year. The Parachutist Badge replaced the "Parachutist Patch" which had previously been worn as a large patch on the side of a paratrooper's garrison cap. LTG Yarborough also designed the Senior and Master Parachutist Badges and the addition of stars to portray the number of combat jumps. The flash that is worn behind the badge is also a contribution of William P. Yarborough.[3]

Basic Parachutist Badge[edit]

To be eligible for award of the basic Parachutist Badge, an individual must have completed the Basic Airborne Course of the Airborne School of the United States Army Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia. To graduate, a student must complete the three-phase course consisting of a ground phase, a tower phase, and a jump phase. By the end of the course, a student will have completed five jumps in varying jump configurations, from a "no load" jump all the way to a full combat load jump at night.[1]

Senior Parachutist Badge[edit]

To be eligible for the Senior Parachutist Badge, an individual must have been rated excellent in character and efficiency and have met the following requirements:

  1. Participated in a minimum of 30 jumps including fifteen jumps with combat equipment to consist of normal TOE equipment including individual weapon carried in combat whether the jump was in actual or simulated combat. In cases of simulated combat the equipment will include water, rations (actual or dummy), ammunition (actual or dummy), and other essential items necessary to sustain an individual in combat. Two night jumps must also be made during the hours of darkness (regardless of time of day with respect to sunset) one of which will be as jumpmaster of a stick. In addition, two mass tactical jumps which culminate in an airborne assault problem with either a unit equivalent to a battalion or larger; a separate company battery; or an organic staff of regimental size or larger. The soldier must fill a position commensurate with his or her rank or grade during the problem.
  2. Either graduated from the Jumpmaster Course of the Airborne Department of the Infantry School or from the Jumpmaster School of a separate airborne battalion or larger airborne unit, or infantry divisions and separate infantry brigades containing organic airborne elements (e.g. the United States Army Alaska (USARAK) or the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) Jumpmaster Course), or served as jumpmaster on one or more combat jumps or as a jumpmaster on 15 noncombat jumps.
  3. Have served on jump status with an airborne unit or other organizations authorized parachutists for a total of at least 24 months.[1]

Master Parachutist Badge[edit]

To be eligible for the Master Parachutist Badge, an individual must have been rated excellent in character and efficiency and have met the following requirements:

  1. Participated in a minimum of 65 jumps including twenty-five jumps with combat equipment to consist of normal TOE equipment, including individual weapon carried by the individual in combat whether the jump was in actual or simulated combat. In cases of simulated combat the equipment will include water rations (actual or dummy), ammunition (actual or dummy), and other essential items necessary to sustain an individual in combat. Four night jumps must also be made during the hours of darkness, one as jumpmaster of a stick. Five mass tactical jumps must be made which culminate in an airborne assault problem with a unit equivalent to a battalion or larger; a separate company/battery; or an organic staff of regimental size or larger. The individual must fill a position commensurate with their rank or grade during the problem.
  2. Either graduated from the Jumpmaster Course of the Airborne Department of the Infantry School or the Jumpmaster School of a separate airborne battalion or larger airborne unit, or infantry divisions and separate infantry brigades containing organic airborne elements, including the U.S. Army Alaska Jumpmaster Course, or served as jumpmaster on one or more combat jumps or as jumpmaster on 33 noncombat jumps.
  3. Have served on jump status with an airborne unit or other organization authorized parachutists for a total of 36 months (may be non-consecutive).

The 25 combat equipment jumps necessary to qualify for the Master Parachutist Badge must be from a static line.[1]

The master parachutist badge is 1+1&#;2 inches (38&#;mm) wide at the widest part of the wings and 1+13&#;64 inches (31&#;mm) from the top of the wreath to the bottom of the parachute where the risers meet in a point.

Airborne background trimming[edit]

A Parachutist Badge of a WWIIveteran from the th Infantry Regiment, as indicated by the background trimming, who made two combat jumps, as denoted by the two Combat Jump Devices on the badge.

Soldiers assigned to Army units on airborne status wear a cloth oval background trimming underneath their Parachutist Badge,[4] which shares the basic design of the unit's beret flash.[5] This is one method by which an individual can identify a parachute qualified soldier serving in a unit on active jump status, called a "Paratrooper," versus a parachutist serving in a non-airborne unit. The original background trimming was also a contribution of William P. Yarborough.[4] Each unit's background trimming design is created and approved by the U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry (TIOH) who evaluate unit lineage, military heraldry, as well as proposed designs by unit members themselves. Once approved, the institute publishes manufacturing instructions to authorized companies for manufacturing.[6]

Combat Jump Device[edit]

If a soldier completes an airborne jump into a combat zone, they are authorized to wear a Combat Jump Device on their Parachutist Badge. The device consists of a star or arrangements of stars, indicating the number of combat jumps.[7] The use of stars as Combat Jump Devices did not gain official approval until after the invasion of Grenada (Operation Urgent Fury). The stars are awarded as follows:[8][6]

US Army Master Parachutist Badges with Combat Jump Devices.png
1 combat jumpA bronze star on the shroud lines
2 combat jumpsA bronze star on each wing
3 combat jumpsA bronze star on each wing and one on the shroud lines
4 combat jumpsTwo bronze stars on each wing
5 + combat jumpsA large gold star on the shroud lines
List of known U.S. combat parachute jumps[9][10][11][12][13][14]
DateUnitOperationTroopersCountryDropzone
8 Nov. th Parachute Infantry Battalion (PIB) Torch Algeria Tafaraoui airfield, La Senia
15 Nov. th PIB Torch - Algeria Youks les Bains
24 Dec. th PIB, Hdqt's. Co. Two French paratroopers 32 Tunisia El Djem
9 Jul. th Parachute Infantry Regiment 3rd Battalion (Jumped first); th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), Includes: th PIR, th PFA & Co. B, th Engr. Husky I 3, Italy Gela, Sicily
10 Jul. th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), Includes: th PIR, 1st & 2nd Btn.; th PFA & Co.A, th Engr. Husky II 2, Italy Gela, Sicily
5 Sep. th PIR 1, New Guinea Nadzab, Markham Valley
13 Sep. th Regimental Combat Team (RCT) Includes: th PIR, th PFA & Co. "A" th Eng. Avalanche1, Italy Paestum, Salerno
14 Sep. th Regimental Combat Team (RCT). Includes: th PIR, th PFA & Co.B th Engr. Avalanche 2, Italy Salerno, Paestum
14 Sep. th PIB Avalanche Italy Avellino
6 June 82nd Airborne Division (, ) th RCT, Includes: th Parachute Infantry Reg., Co. B/ Engineer Battalion and th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion. 28 Pathfinders, th PIR, (7 returned). Overlord, Titanic (Dropping of parachute dummies, "Oscar"). 6, France Normandy
6 June st Airborne Division [, , , , ] Overlord, Titanic (Dropping of parachute dummies, "Oscar"). 6, France Normandy
3 July rd PRCT, 1st Bn. Table Tennis New Guinea Noemfoor Island
4 July rd PRCT, 3rd Bn. Table Tennis New Guinea Noemfoor Island
15 Aug. 1st Abn. Task Force (th PFA, rd PFABn.; th PIB; th PCT; st PIB; th PCEng. Co.) Dragoon5, France Cote d' Azur, Riviera
17 Sep. 82nd Airborne Division (), th RCT, Includes: th PIR, th PFA, & Co.B, th Engr.; th RCT, Includes: th PIR, th PFA, & Co.A, Engr Market Garden7, Netherlands Grave & Nijmegen
17 Sep. st Airborne Division [, , ] Market Garden 6, Netherlands Eindhoven
29 Nov. , 5 Dec. Co.C, th Abn.Eng, Bn. Co.C., 1st Pl.., th P/GIR st AB. Med. Co.; th PFA 11th Abn. Div. Hdqt's Group th Pcht. Signal Co. 11th Abn. Div. RECON Pl. Tabletop Leyte Manarawat
3 Feb. th PIR, th FABn. Shoestring 1, Philippines Tagaytay Ridge
16 Feb. rd PRCT, nd PFABn; st Airborne Engr. Btn. Topside 2, Philippines Corregidor
23 Feb. th Parachute Infantry Regiment: 1st Btn., Co.B; Hdqt's Co., 1st Btn.; Hdqt's Co., 1st Btn., Light Machine Gun Platoon Rescue 2, internees Philippines Los Banos Prison Camp
24 Mar. 17th Airborne Division ( PIR, PIR, PFA, PFA, AEB, AMC, AAB, AQM, ASC, GFA GFA, AOC & GIR). Also small units: MP's, Division Artillery, Reconnaissance Platoon, & Parachute Maintenance Co. Varsity 4, Germany Wesel
23 June th PIR Gypsy 1, Philippines Aparri
20 Oct. th ARCT, 2nd Battalion DZ Easy 1, Korea Sukchon
20 Oct. th ARCT, 1st, 3rd. Bn's. DZ William 1, Korea Sukchon
21 Oct. th Airborne Regimental Combat Team (ARCT). DZ William Korea Sukchon
23 Mar. th ARCT, 2nd & 3rd Bns; th ABN Field Artillery Bn; 2nd & 4th ABN Ranger Cos, and Indian army surgical team. Tomahawk 3, Korea Munsan-Ni
12 Feb. FTT-1 White Star SF Team Nam Beng Valley Campaign vs. Pathet Lao 12 Laos Nam Tha airstrip
2 Jan. Joint General Staff reserve ARVN Paratroopers with U.S. MACV "Red Hat" Advisors from Saigon Ap Bac South Vietnamese, 2 Americans South Vietnam Ap Tan Thoi
22 Feb. rd Airborne Brigade, rd P.I.R., 2nd & 3rd Btl's,; 3/ Airborne Field Artillery Regiment (AFAR). Junction City Vietnam Katum
2 Apr. 5th Special Force Group (ABN), 1st Special Forces: Detachments, A Mike Force & A, Operation Harvest Moon (Includes Montagnards) Harvest Moon (includes Montagnards) Vietnam Bunard, Phouc Long "Happy Dragon" Province
5 Sep. USMC, 1st Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol (LRRP) Oregon10 Vietnam South
5 Oct. 5th Special Force Group (ABN), 1st Special Forces: Pathfinder Detachment (12 SF, 37 ARVN Pathfinders), "B" Co II CTZ (Pleiku) Mike Force (50 SF) & LLDB (Includes Montagnards) Blue Max Vietnam Bu Prang CIDG fighting camp, Quang Duc "Great Virtue" Province
? Military Assistance Command, Vietnam – Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG) Airborne Studies Group (SOG 36) Eldest Son, Italian Green, Pole Bean North Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia
28 Nov. Recon Team Florida, CCN, MACV-SOG (High Altitude Low Opening [HALO]) 3 Americans, one ARVN officer and 2 Montagnards Laos NVA road inside Laos
7 May Captain Larry Manes' Recon Team, CCN, MACV-SOG (HALO) 4 Americans South Vietnam Between Ashau Valley and Khe Sanh, NVA trail extension of Laotian Highway
22 June Sergeant Major Billy Waugh's Recon Team, CCN, MACV-SOG (HALO) 4 Americans South Vietnam 60 miles SW of Danang
22 Sep. Captain Jim Storter's Recon Team, CCC, MACV-SOG (HALO) 4 Americans South Vietnam Plei Trap Valley, NW of Pleiku
11 Oct. Sgt. 1st Class Dick Gross' Recon Team, CCC, MACV-SOG (HALO) 5 Americans Vietnam 25 miles, SW of Pleiku in the Ia Drang Valley
23 Oct. Navy SEAL Team and USAF CCT Urgent Fury 15 Grenada Port Salines
25 Oct. 75th Ranger Regiment LRS Detachment, 82nd Abn Div. combat controllers (CCT), Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC), 12 troopers; 4 troopers, 1st Bn, tactical air control parties (TACP). Urgent Fury 16(?) Grenada Point Salines
25 Oct. Navy SEAL Team Urgent Fury 11 Grenada Governor's residence
25 Oct. 75th Ranger Regiment 1st and 2nd Bns; and two paratroopers (SGT Spain and SPC Richardson from th Engineer Bn) Urgent Fury Grenada Point Salines airfield
20 Dec. UNIT: () Rangers, 75th Ranger Regiment; 82nd Airborne Division Ready Brigade Just Cause 4, Panama Rio Hato east to Fort Cimarron
20 Dec. () Rangers; () 82nd Abn. Div., 1st Brigade Task Force: 1/th PIR, 1/th PIR; 2nd Bn., th PIR; 4th Bn., th Abn. Inf. Reg., Co. B and C; A Co., 3/ PIR; 3rd Bn., 73rd Abn. Armor Reg.; 82nd Abn. MP Co., 3 platoons (). All joined to form: Task Force Pacific. Just Cause 2, Panama Torrijos-Tocumen Airport
15 Jan. Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (HAHO) Desert Storm 12 Iraq Northwest desert
Dec. Navy SEAL Team 6 Raw Deal Haiti Navassa Island
19 Oct. 75th Ranger Regiment Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan Objective Rhino at Dry Lake Airstrip
13 Nov. 75th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Battalion Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan In the vicinity of Alimarden Kan-E-Bagat
25 Feb. 75th Ranger Regiment, 2nd Battalion; th Infantry, 3rd Battalion Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan Near Chahar Borjak, Nimruz Province
24 Mar. 75th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Battalion; 24th Special Tactics Squadron Operation Iraqi Freedom Iraq Northwestern desert region of Iraq, in the vicinity of Al Qaim
26 Mar. rd Airborne Brigade Operation Iraqi Freedom Iraq Bashur Drop zone
Mar. 27th Engineer Battalion; 75th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Battalion; 75th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Battalion; 24th Special Tactics Squadron Operation Iraqi Freedom Iraq At H1 Airfield
3 Jul. 75th Ranger Regiment, Regimental Reconnaissance Detachment (HALO) Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan Southeastern Region
31 Jul. USMC 1st Reconnaissance Battalion (HAHO) Operation Iraqi Freedom 6 Iraq Near Baghdad
30 May 10th Special Forces Group, 3rd Battalion, ODA (HALO) Operation Iraqi Freedom 11 Iraq Ninewah Province
11 Jul. 75th Ranger Regiment, Regimental Reconnaissance Company, Team 1 Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan
25 Jan. Navy DEVGRU (SEAL Team 6) Hostage Rescue Somalia
31 Oct. Navy DEVGRU (SEAL Team 6) Hostage Rescue 30 Nigeria

Air Force[edit]

Like the Army, the Air Force issues the same parachutist badges in the same three degrees (Basic, Senior, & Master) but have different criteria for the awarding of these badges. The level of degree is determined by the number of jumps the wearer has successfully completed, years of service on jump status, and other requirements as specified by AFI , Aviation and Parachutist Service, Aeronautical Ratings and Badges.[15] Additionally Airmen who have earned the Parachutist Badge while serving as members of a sister branch then transferred to the U.S. Air Force are allowed to continue wear of the badge without having to requalify.[16]

Air Force Basic Parachutist Badge

Basic Badge

Air Force Senior Parachutist Badge

Senior Badge

Air Force Master Parachutist Badge

Master Badge

In the Air Force began issuing a unique Basic, Senior, and Master Parachutist Badges. These parachutist badges were modeled after the Air Force's Medical Badges. Due to popular demand, the Air Force decided to revert to issuing the Army style parachutist badges in [17]

Basic Parachutist Badge[edit]

The Basic Parachutist Badge may be awarded following completion of basic parachute training through a designated Air Force Air-Ground Training Program. Air Force personnel generally earn the basic parachutist badge either through the Army's Airborne School at Fort Benning, or the United States Air Force Academy's AM freefall parachute training course taught by AETC's 98th Flying Training Squadron.[15]

Senior Parachutist Badge[edit]

The Senior Parachutist Badge consists of the Basic Parachutist Badge with a star atop the parachute. Awarded for 30 static line jumps with a minimum of 24 months of cumulative time on jump status. The 30 jumps must include: (1) Two jumps during the hours of darkness; (2) Fifteen jumps with operational equipment IAW AFI ; (3) Actually perform one night jump as a Primary JM (PJM); and (4) Seven jumps performing as PJM.[18]

Master Parachutist Badge[edit]

The Master Parachutist Insignia consists of the Senior Parachutist Badge with a star centered within the wreath. Awarded for 65 static line jumps with a minimum of 36 months of cumulative time on jump status. The 65 jumps must include: (1) Four jumps during the hours of darkness; (2) Twenty-five jumps with operational equipment IAW AFI ; (3) Two night jumps performing PJM duties; and (4) Fifteen jumps performing as PJM.[18]

Military Freefall Parachutist Badges[edit]

Main article: Military Freefall Parachutist Badge

Army & Air Force HALO/HAHO Badge

Military Freefall Parachutist Badge

Army & Air Force Master HALO/HAHO Badges

Master Military Freefall Parachutist Badge

Qualified Army and Air Force personnel may go on to earn the Military Freefall Parachutist Badge in special operations training for High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) and High Altitude High Opening (HAHO) jumps. HALO/HAHO training is conducted by the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School of the US Army Special Operations Command, on behalf of the US Special Operations Command. It is awarded in two degrees: Basic and Master. To earn the basic badge, the jumper must have graduated from Army Airborne School and the Military Free-Fall Parachutist Course.[19] To earn the master badge, jumpers must have graduated from Army Airborne School, Army Jumpmaster School, Military Free-Fall Parachutist Course, and the Military Free-Fall Jumpmaster Course.[20]

As with the Army's Parachutist Badges, US Army parachutist that have earned one of the Military Freefall Parachutist Badges are also eligible to earn Combat Jump Devices.[1][6][12]

Navy and Marine Corps[edit]

The United States Navy and Marine Corps issue parachutist insignia in two degrees: the U.S. Military Basic Parachutist Badge, also called the Basic Parachutist Insignia (the same badge that's awarded to all DoD military services), and the Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia. Parachutist insignia is available to personnel who perform jumps as a:[21]

  • Static-Line Parachute Jumper,
  • Military Free-Fall Parachute Jumper, and
  • High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) Parachute Jumper (used for premeditated personnel parachute (P3) operations).

Training is accomplished by successful completion of the prescribed course of instruction while attending the:[21]

Basic Parachutist Insignia[edit]

The right to wear the Basic Parachutist Insignia is based on the completion of prescribed training defined in MCO [21]

When an enlisted member initially qualifies as a static line parachutist, an entry shall be made on NAVPERS / (commonly referred to as a "Page 13" entry) of the service record indicating the date of qualification, type(s) of aircraft in which qualified, and unit at which the training was received. Enlisted members are authorized the parachutist (PJ)designator added to their rating.[21]

A qualified static-line parachute jumper who successfully completes the prescribed program of instruction while attending a formal, interservice training facility including a minimum of 10 military free-fall parachute jumps, at least 2 of which must have been conducted carrying full combat equipment (1 day/1 night), may qualify. Enlisted members are authorized the military free-fall parachutist (FPJ) designator added to their rating.[21]

When an officer initially qualifies as a static line parachutist, the additional qualification designator (AQD) of BT1 will be entered into the officer's record by their detailer (NAVPERS). Free-fall qualification will result in an AQD of BT2.[21]

For both Static Line and Military Free Fall Parachutist qualified personnel, a service record entry shall also indicate whether or not the member is HALO-qualified.[21]

The Basic Parachutist Badge is a prerequisite for the Special Warfare Badge since parachutist training is an integral part of the Navy's Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) program. SEAL personnel generally do not wear the Basic badge once they earn their Special Warfare insignia, but will wear their Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Badge in addition to the Special Warfare Badge, the latter nicknamed the "Budweiser" badge. Navy EOD technicians are generally also jump qualified with a number of them also being qualified in military free-fall (HALO/HAHO). Currently, due to a recent change, newly pinned Navy EOD technicians are required to attend the U.S. Army's Basic Airborne School upon graduation. As well, a number of SWCC personnel earn Basic Parachutist badges in conjunction with their assignment to a Special Boat Team detachment that uses the Maritime Craft Air Delivery System (MCADS). This enables them to drop small watercraft and their crews from C aircraft.[21]

Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia[edit]

The Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia (originally issued as Navy Parachute Rigger wings) is a gold-colored embroidered or metal insignia depicting an open parachute with outstretched wings. It is authorized for officers and enlisted personnel who were awarded the Basic Parachutist Insignia and, under competent orders, have completed a minimum of five additional static-line or P3 jumps, to include: (1) combat equipment day jump, two (2) combat equipment night jumps, and employ at least two (2) different types of military aircraft.[21]

The U.S Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist badge was originally known as the U.S. Navy Certified Parachute Rigger badge and designed by American Insignia Company in for graduates of the U.S. Navy Parachute Rigger School. During WWII, despite being against uniform regulations it became common for U.S. Marine Corps paratroopers who were issued the silver U.S. Army Basic Parachutist badge to wear the gold Navy Certified Parachute Rigger badge because they believed the gold "Rigger wings" looked better on their uniform.[22] This out of regulations wearing of the Parachute Rigger badge became so common that in July , the Commander of United States Marine Corps Force Reconnaissance Bruce F. Meyers sent a request to the Chief of Naval Operations Admiral George W. Anderson Jr. via Marine Corps Commandant General David M. Shoup requesting to officially make the Navy Parachute Rigger badge the parachutist badge for the Navy and Marine Corps. The request was approved by Admiral Anderson on July 12, per BuPers Notice [23] Since , being a graduate of the U.S. Navy Parachute Rigger School is no longer a requirement to earn the badge. To be awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia did, however, require the parachutist to have completed the minimum five additional jumps in a jump billet.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdeU.S. Army Regulation , Military Awards, Official Department of the Army Regulation, dated 11 Dec , revised 15 Sep , last accessed 4 Oct
  2. ^Army Directive , Change to Wear of the Army Combat Uniform (ACU) ItemsArchived 10 May at the Wayback Machine, Secretary of the Army, 13 June , last accessed 18 February
  3. ^Born, K (). "U.S. Army Parachute Badge". US Army Quartermaster Museum. Archived from the original on 5 November Retrieved 22 November
  4. ^ abLanham, Howard G. (). "Insignia of Airborne Units U.S. Army". American Military Patches, Other Insignia and Decorations of World War Two. Retrieved 15 November
  5. ^"Beret Flashes and Background Trimmings". The Institute of Heraldry. United States Department of the Army. Archived from the original on 22 August Retrieved 15 November
  6. ^ abcArmy Regulation , Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, dated 25 May , last accessed 2 January
  7. ^"US Army Badges". US Army Institute of Heraldry. Archived from the original on 15 June Retrieved 8 February
  8. ^U.S. Army Parachute Badge, U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum, last accessed 18 February
  9. ^United States Combat Jumps, GlobalSecurity.org, last updated 7 May , last accessed 17 February
  10. ^Plaster, John L. (). SOG: The Secret Wars of America's Commandos in Vietnam. New York: Simon & Schuster. p.&#; ISBN&#;.
  11. ^Units Credited With Assault Landings, General Orders No. 10, Department of the Army, dated 25 September , last accessed 30 April
  12. ^ abHitting the ground with coalition partners; Special Warfare Magazine; Valume 21, Issue 6; dated November–December , last accessed 17 February
  13. ^History of Military Operational Parachute Jumps, Special Forces Association, dated 7 March , last accessed 30 April
  14. ^These are the only 5 combat jumps by US troops that we know about since September 11, Business Insider, by Eric Milzarski from "We Are The Mighty" program, dated 7 October , last accessed 9 July
  15. ^ abAFI , Aviation and Parachutist Service, Aeronautical Ratings and BadgesArchived 12 January at the Wayback Machine, U.S. Air Force Instructions, dated 13 December , last accessed 11 January
  16. ^https://static.e-publishing.af.mil/production/1/af_a1/publication/afi/afipdf
  17. ^Obsolete USAF InsigniaArchived 2 November at the Wayback Machine, USAF Flag Ranks website, last accessed 1 June
  18. ^ ab"Archived copy"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 1 December Retrieved 25 March CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  19. ^MFFPC ATRRS Information Changes, U.S. Army Special Operations Center of Excellence, last accessed 22 April
  20. ^Military Free-Fall Jumpmaster Course (MFFJMC), U.S. Army Special Operations Center of Excellence, last accessed 22 April
  21. ^ abcdefghiU.S. Marine Corps Order , U.S. Marine Corps Parachuting Policy and Program Administration, dated 4 May , last accessed 18 February
  22. ^Mason, Chris (). Paramarine!: Uniforms and Equipment of Marine Corps Parachute Units in World War II. Schiffer Pub Ltd. pp.&#;– ISBN&#;.
  23. ^"Evolution of Naval Wings"(PDF). Coast Guard Aviation History. THE U.S. COAST GUARD AVIATION ASSOCIATION. Archived from the original(PDF) on 9 February Retrieved 25 January

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parachutist_Badge_(United_States)
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Parachutist badge

Paratrooper badges of various states' militaries.

A parachutist badge (or parachutist brevet) is a military badge awarded by the armed forces of many states to soldiers who have received parachute training and completed the required number of jumps. It is difficult to assess which country was the first to introduce such an award.

France[edit]

Army[edit]

Insigne de la PM Para.JPG

The School of Airborne Troops oversees different courses.

Military Parachute Trainee[edit]

The Military Parachute Trainee Badge (French: Brevet de préparation militaire parachutiste (PMP)) is a badge created in and aimed at reservists and national service personnel. The laureates of the badge could serve in airborne units and eventually train at the Airborne School for the Military Parachute Badge in a short course. Since the end of conscription in France, the PMP Badge is awarded to prospective soldiers in airborne units after a 4-week course.

Military Parachute Initiation[edit]

Initiation Parachutiste.jpg

The Military Parachuting Initiation Badge (French: Brevet d'initiation au parachutisme militaire (BIPM)) was created in and aimed at military personnel outside of airborne units. It was awarded for four daytime jumps. The BIMP course was closed in for French personnel, but the badge is still awarded to members of foreign militaries after a short course at the Airborne School.

Military Parachute[edit]

Brevet Parachutiste.jpg

The Military Parachute Badge (French: Brevet parachutiste militaire (BPM)) is the standard course for every personnel in airborne units and all graduates of the école spéciale militaire de Saint-Cyr. It was created in and is awarded for six jumps, three daylight standard jumps, one daylight jump with the reserve parachute, one night jump without equipment, one night jump with full gear and equipment.

Parachute Monitor[edit]

Instructeur Para.jpg

The Parachutist Monitor Badge (French: Brevet de moniteur parachutiste) is awarded to long-serving NCO in airborne units. Its graduates can teach the basics of parachute jumping to trainees, act as technical advisors on parachute matters and be jumpmasters both in units or at the Airborne Schools.

Operational Free Fall[edit]

Chuteur Opérationnel.jpg

The Operational Free Fall Badge (French: Brevet de chuteur opérationnel) is awarded to graduates of long courses in Military Free Fall techniques. All graduates must have at least finished the Military Parachute Course and have some years of experience in airborne units. The Operational Free Fall Badge is part of the pipeline training for special forces and for commando platoons within the Airborne units.

High-altitude Parachute Instructor[edit]

Moniteur chuteur.jpg

The High-altitude Parachute Instructor (French: Brevet d'instructeur au saut en ouverture commandée retardée (INSOCR)) is awarded to long-serving NCO in airborne units wishing to become jumpmasters in Free Fall jumping. All graduates must have finished the Operational Free Fall course and serve some years in an airborne unit using HALO/HAHO techniques.

Air Force[edit]

There is no Airborne School in the Air Force&#;; jump training is held at the (Army) Airborne School, but the Air Force uses some specific badges for advanced parachute training.

Military Parachute Initiation[edit]

Initiation Parachutiste.jpg

The Military Parachuting Initiation Badge is awarded to graduates of a short course at the (Army) Airborne School, where the only students are Air Force cadets. It is awarded after four daytime jumps.

Military Parachute Badge[edit]

Para-armée-air-qualif.jpg

The Military Parachute Badge (Air Force) is awarded to Air Force personnel, already graduates of the (Army) Airborne School, serving in the Fusiliers Commandos de l'Air, the airborne infantry units of the Air Force. A minimum of 30 jumps is required for the award of the Air Force badge.

Special Parachute[edit]

The Special Parachute Badge (French&#;: Brevet de parachutiste spécialisé) is the Free Fall badge of the Air Force. It is awarded after long courses at both the (Army) Airborne School and the Fusiliers Commandos Training Squadron.

Germany[edit]

Nazi Germany[edit]

German Democratic Republic[edit]

Members of the Army Air Assault Regiment 40 of the German Democratic Republic's National People's Army were awarded the parachutist badge upon completion of the paratrooper training course.

Federal Republic of Germany[edit]

Parachutist badge in bronze
GSG9 parachutist badge of the Federal Police of Germany

Military
The parachutist badge of the Bundeswehr is awarded upon completion of the parachutist course conducted at the Airborne/Air mobile school at Altenstadt, Germany.

Allied forces who complete the requirements may also be awarded the German parachutist badge.

The badge is awarded in three levels:

Level I Bronze Completion of basic course and five jumps
Level II Silver 20 jumps
Level III Gold 50 jumps

The badge features a stylized parachute surrounded by a wreath of oak leaves which are flanked on the left and right side by stylized wings.[1]

Federal Police
Members of the Federal Police'sGSG9 who are specially qualified in parachuting, including High-altitude military parachuting and are assigned to the parachuting section are awarded the GSG9's parachutist badge.[2]

Hungary[edit]

Main article: Parachutist Badge (Hungary)

India[edit]

Regimental insignia of the Parachute Regiment (India).


Para Wings of the Special Forces of India.

Parachute Regiment Indian Army Insignia.png

Italy[edit]

The Italian Armed Forces issue four different degrees of the Military Parachutist Badge, common to all services, as follows:[3]

  • Military Parachutist (Paracadutista Militare). The basic military qualification badge.
  • War Parachutist (Paracadutista di Guerra). Same as the Military Parachutist Badge, but in golden metal. Awarded as an honor mark to WW2 paratrooper veterans, and to present-day paratroopers after 30 years of jump-status.
  • Jumpmaster Parachutist (Paracadutista Direttore di Lancio). Same as the Military Parachutist Badge, but on a red cloth background.
  • High-Altitude Launch Qualified Raider (Incursore Abilitato all'Effettuazione di Lanci ad Alta Quota). Similar to the US Military Freefall Parachutist Badge, awarded only to Special Forces personnel.

Military personnel qualified and a civilian parachutist can be allowed to use the relative insignia on the uniform,[4] called the Jump Qualified Parachutist badge (Paracadutista Abilitato al Lancio). The Civilian Parachutist badge is similar to the Military Parachutist one, but without the star.

  • Military Parachutist - Italy

  • Civilian Parachutist - Italy

The Netherlands[edit]

The parachute course are done by the "Defensie Para School".[5] The Armed Forces of the Netherlands know 9 types of para wings:

  • B brevet (Automatic Opening/ Static Line). Prerequisite: 5 jumps, the certificate and brevet are awarded by the Dutch sport Parachute centres at Texel and Teuge and maybe awarded by other Dutch centres if authorised. It is also awarded to foreign jumpers who qualify on Dutch soil.
  • A brevet, Operational Parachutist, Static Line. Prerequisite: 8 jumps, and the last 3 have to been completed with gear and weapon, and the last one needs to be made at night. Maximum altitude: meters. The course is completed by members of 11th Airmobile Brigade and the Royal Netherlands Marine Corps.
  • SLS brevet, Operational Parachutist, Static Line, Square.. The same as the A certificate, with the last one with gear and weapon, and the last one needs to be made at night. Only for the reconnaissance platoons of the Royal Netherlands Marine Corps
  • B brevet, Parachutist Free Fall: Of the at least 20 jumps, 3 have to be made with "Accelerated Free Fall method", also a night jump has to be done. This certificate is mostly done by Parachutist riggers, and Royal Netherlands Air Force Oxygen Supervisors.
  • C brevet, Operational Parachutist, Free fall. Prerequisite: 20 jumps, again 3 jumps with gear and weapon, 2 night jumps, one with gear and weapon, maximum altitude is ± meters. All Army Commandos, need to do the course during the Phase 3 of the Commando Course, and members of the MARSOF of the Royal Netherlands Marine Corps.
  • C-OPS brevet, Operation Parachutist, Free fall. Prerequisite: 10 jumps, during day and night, 8 jumps with gear, navigation console and weapon, 5 need to be made with backpack. The maximum altitude is meters, 3 need to be a precision jump. Advanced course after the C certificate course, it focus on group jumps, and the course is for operators of the Army Commandos.
  • D brevet, HALO/HAHO. Prerequisite: The amount of jumps depend on the proficiency of the student and the jumps are with a maximum altitude of meters with oxygen. The course is only done by Commando groups, who are specialised in HALO/ HAHO jumps, and instructors of the Parachutist Training Group.
  • Operational Wings: Rare wing, the last time given to a member happened on 10 March in Indonesia. For the first time since , an operational jump was made again, given to 9 members of Corps command troops, Task Force 55, after a successful insertion in Afghanistan in , second time given, in , to 32 member of Corps command troops, the Special Operations Land Task Group in Mali, after a successful insertion in and third time give, in , to 8 members of the Marines Special Operations Land Task Group in Mali after a successful insertion in
  • Dispatcher/ Instructor wing: Rewarded after the dispatcher course, with a proficiency in Static Line and Free fall

Philippines[edit]

Main article: AFP Parachutist Badge

The AFP Parachutist Badge[6] also known as the "Airborne Badge" is awarded by the Chief of Staff, AFP to AFP Personnel, Military Cadets, and Officer Candidates who have satisfactorily completed the requirements of the Basic Airborne Course[7] set forth in the POI conducted by the Airborne School, Special Forces Regiment (Airborne).[8]

Poland[edit]

Polish "Odznaka Spadochronowa"

The Polish Odznaka Spadochronowa was based on the previous award called the Odznaka Pilota Wojskowego, or Military Pilot Badge. It was first introduced by notable Polish sculptor Władysław Gruberski in and was accepted shortly afterwards as the sign of all the pilots of the Polish Air Forces. The badge featured an eagle with wide spread wings, holding a laurel wreath in his bill.

In , after the creation of the UK-trained 1st Independent Parachute Brigade, a similar symbol was adopted as the sign of all Polish paras. It featured a diving silver eagle. The symbol was also adopted by the cichociemni and nowadays is used by all branches of the Polish Army. Also, the Polish special unit GROM adopted a modified version of the symbol as its emblem. It is commonly (though informally) referred to as gapa (diving Eagle).

Singapore[edit]

The Silver Wings is awarded upon successful completion of the Basic Airborne Course conducted by the Parachute Training Wing, School of Commandos. First awarded to the pioneering graduating batch of 27 NSFs from Second Company, 1st Commando Battalion (1 Cdo Bn) of the Singapore Commandos Formation, it comprises a pair of outspread wings on both wigs of a deployed parachute, with the words "SINGAPURA" below the canopy. With the design sanctioned by 1 Cdo Bn's Commanding Officer, Tan Kim Peng Clarence, it is differentiated by a crimsonvelvet backing for Commandos, while those of the Commando Parachute Jump Instructors have a golden velvet backing. Non-Commandos wear the badge without any backing.

Spain[edit]

The Spanish Air Force instituted in their own uniform regulations,[9] which included the parachutist badge known as Rokiski, awarded to all the soldiers who completed the Basic Airborne Course in the Paratrooper Military School (Escuela Militar de Paracaidismo) "Méndez Parada" along with the title of Paratrooper Hunter (Cazador Paracaidista). Personnel with this badge can only wear it while in service in a paratrooper unit or if the permanent status is awarded. Permanent status is granted to military personnel if:

  • Has been 2 or more years in a paratrooper unit.
  • A service related injury prevent him/her from staying 2 or more years in a paratrooper unit.
  • Has jumped at least 3 times in enemy territory in a conflict zone.

United Kingdom[edit]

Main article: Parachutist Badge (United Kingdom)

United States[edit]

The United States Parachutist Badge (also commonly referred to as "Jump Wings") is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces.

After making five more jumps in a jump billet, members of the Navy and Marine Corps are authorized to wear the gold wings of Naval and Marine parachutists in lieu of their initial award of Basic Parachutist Badge. There are three versions of the Parachutist Badge.[10] The United States Coast Guard is the only service which does not issue a Parachutist Badge and does not have personnel serving on jump status; however, Coast Guard members are entitled to receive the Parachutist Badge of another service if the proper training was received. The badge is awarded to U.S. Armed Forces personnel upon completion of the United States Army Airborne School Basic Airborne Course or freefall parachute training at the United States Air Force Academy.[11]

If awarded, Army parachutists who meet the qualifications and jump with a foreign service may also wear one set of foreign wings on their Class A uniform.[12] According to AFI, page (edition of 2 August ), Air Force personnel may wear foreign-awarded jump wings while stationed in the awarding country or attending an official or social function hosted by the awarding government, and if the recipient has already been awarded US jump wings.[13]

The original Parachutist Badge was designed in by Lieutenant General (then Captain) William P. Yarborough and approved by the Department of the Army in March of that year. In addition to the Parachutist Badge, U.S. Army paratroopers wore a "paraglider" patch on the front left side (enlisted) or right side (officers) of the garrison cap. Until the late s, glider units were also included within Airborne divisions, hence the parachute and glider on the cap. The garrison cap with the paraglider patch was replaced by the maroon beret. Troops of the st Airborne Division (Air Assault), a former parachute unit, continued to wear the garrison cap with patch until the black beret was adopted Army-wide except for of organizations already wearing maroon (Airborne) or green (Special Forces) berets, and or switched from black to tan (Ranger).

The U.S Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist badge was originally known as the U.S. Navy Certified Parachute Rigger badge and designed by American Insignia Company in for graduates of the U.S. Navy Parachute Rigger School. During WWII, despite being against uniform regulations it became common for U.S. Marine Corps paratroopers who were issued the silver U.S. Army Basic Parachutist badge to wear the gold Navy Certified Parachute Rigger badge because they believed the gold "Rigger wings" looked better on their uniform.[14] This unauthorized wear of the Parachute Rigger badge became so common that in July the Commander of United States Marine Corps Force Reconnaissance Bruce F. Meyers sent a request to Chief of Naval Operations Admiral George W. Anderson Jr. via Marine Corps Commandant General David M. Shoup requesting to officially make the Navy Parachute Rigger badge the parachutist badge for the Navy and Marine Corps. The request was approved by Admiral Anderson on 12 July per BuPers Notice [15] Since , being a graduate of the U.S. Navy Parachute Rigger School is no longer a requirement to earn the badge.

  • Military Freefall Parachutist Badge

  • Master Military Freefall Parachutist Badge

  • Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Badge

Other countries[edit]

  • Argentina: In the Argentinian Army, personnel who complete the basic parachutist training receive a badge consisting of a silver winged parachute. A golden badge is awarded to personnel after fulfilling certain requirements, including a number of years spent in a parachute unit, a number of jumps and completion of at least two more parachute-related courses besides the basic one, such as rigger, jumpmaster, free-fall jump, etc. This system replaced the one existing until when, despite parachute experience, officers wore a golden badge, NCOs a silver one and privates a smaller silver one. Navy, Air Force and Gendarmerie parachutists were similar badges to those of the Army.
  • Czechoslovakia: Czechoslovak badges were awarded in three classes:
3rd Class[16]
2nd Class[17]
1st Class[18]

Canadian Jump Wings

  • Canada: Canadian Paratroopers with Canadian Jump Wings date back to the days of the 1st Special Service Force and 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion of World War II. In Canada had its own distinctive wings, worn on the left breast above service ribbons. This style was awarded until when the current wings were introduced. There are two classes of Canadian Jump Wings, red maple leaf for completion of the Basic Parachutist's Course, and white maple leaf for completing the course and sufficient months of service in a designated parachutist's position. The Canadian Airborne Regiment (April to March ) were the most well known wearers of the Canadian Jump Wings. After its disbandment in , the Canadian army's parachute traditions reverted to the pre practice of maintaining a parachute company within one of the battalions of each of the regular infantry regiments. Many of the Airborne Regiment's soldiers, returned to their regimental "homes" and stood up companies in the light battalion of each of their regiments (the 3rd Battalion The Royal Canadian Regiment, the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry and the 3rd Battalion Royal 22e Régiment). These soldiers are entitled to wear the white leaf jump wings. Foreign service members and all other graduates who complete the Canadian basic parachutist course will receive the red leaf jump wings.

Examples of other parachutist badges from around the world[edit]

Former countries[edit]

References[edit]

https://juleswings.wordpress.com//03/31/australian-army-dress-manual-chapterbadges-emblems/

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parachutist_badge
Paratroopers Beret With Badge

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With wings badge parachute

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Inside the Special Forces Military Free Fall School

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